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Statistics published: school workforce in England 2018

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The Department for Education has published its school workforce statistics for 2018, and below is a summary of the key findings. You can read the full data release here

Key findings

Overall teacher and teaching assistant numbers:

  • There were 453,400 full-time equivalent (FTE) teachers working in state-funded schools in England in 2018, an increase of 0.3% on 2017

- FTE nursery and primary teachers increased by 0.5% to 222,100 in 2018

- FTE secondary teachers decreased by 0.3% to 203,700 in 2018

- FTE special school teachers increased by 4.1% to 23,700 in 2018

  • There were 263,900 FTE teaching assistants in 2018, an increase of 0.5% on 2017

- FTE nursery and primary teaching assistants increased by 0.3% to 176,700 in 2018

- FTE secondary teaching assistants decreased by 3% to 45,900 in 2018

- FTE special school teaching assistants increased by 6.6% to 39,400 in 2018.

Recruitment and retention rates:

  • There were 44,600 FTE qualified new entrants to teaching in state-funded schools in 2018, with a new entrants rate of 10.3% (the same as in 2017), made up of:

- 23,500 newly qualified teachers

- 4,600 teachers who are new to the state-funded sector

- 16,400 who are returning to teaching after a break

  • There were 42,100 FTE qualified teachers who left teaching in 2018, at a rate of 9.8% (lower than in 2017 when the rate was 10.2%), made up of:

- 6,300 in service qualified teachers who retired

- 35,600 qualified teachers who are out of service – this includes those leaving the profession, and those who are taking a break/may return

- 130 qualified teachers who died whilst in service

  • Changes in working patterns in 2018 have resulted in a decrease equivalent to approximately 3,000 FTE qualified teachers between 2017 and 2018

- 18,500 (4%) qualified teachers increased their working hours

- 25,300 (5%) qualified teachers decreased their working hours

  • Retention rates have continued to decline slightly each year - 2018 retention rates:

- One-year rate (those that qualified in 2017): 15.3% left the profession

2017 retention rate (those that qualified in 2016): 14.9%

- Three-year rate (those that qualified in 2015): 26.6% 

2017 rate (those that qualified in 2014): 26.1% 

- Five-year rate (those that qualified in 2013): 32.3%

2017 rate (those that qualified in 2012): 31.5%.

Vacancy rates:

  • The total number of vacancies in 2018 for all state-funded schools was 987, an increase from 944 in 2017. However, both equate to 0.3% of the total workforce
  • The total number of temporarily filled posts was 2,777, a decrease from 3,046 in 2017 (equivalent to 0.8% of the total workforce in both cases).

Pupil-teacher ratio (PTR):

  • In 2018 the PTR for all state-funded nursery and primary schools remained at 20.9, and for all state-funded secondary schools it continued a trend of year-on-year increases to 16.3 (up from 16.0 in 2017).

Teachers' and school leaders' pay rates

  • Average pay rates in 2018 have increased slightly from 2017, with the average mean for all FTE teachers in state-funded schools rising by £810 (approximately a 2% increase)

- FTE average salary for all full and part-time classroom teachers is £36,200

- FTE average salary for all leadership teachers is £53,700

- FTE average salary for all headteachers is £70,100

These figures will include executive leadership/CEO salary rates, which are likely to increase the average rates 

  • Average pay in 2018 was higher for males across all phases, with the difference increasing in the more senior positions:

- classroom teachers – average for males is £36,900 compared to £36,000 for females 

- leadership grades – average for males is £62,700 compared to £57,200 for females 

- head teachers – average for males is £75,500 compared to £67,400 for females 

  • Head teachers earn more on average in academies, but classroom and leadership teachers earn more on average in local authority maintained schools across all phases of education.

Qualifications:

  • 98.7% of all teachers in state-funded schools hold qualifications at degree level or higher
  • The number of non-specialists teaching subjects without a relevant post A-level qualification in 2018 are as follows:

- engineering: 82.5%

- Spanish: 48.7%

- ICT: 47.8%

- computing: 64%

- physics: 37.3%

- geography: 33.8%

- business/economics: 31.5%

- german: 29.3%

- chemistry: 27.7%

- history: 25.3%

- French: 24.6%

- mathematics: 21.7%

- English baccalaureate average: 21.3%.

Gender split in teaching staff:

  • In 2018, women made up 75.6% of the teaching workforce, an increase from 73.8% in 2017. Broken down, this equates to:

- 85.8% in nurseries and primary schools

- 64.2% in secondary schools

- 73.6% in special schools.

 About the data:

  • The release is based on data collected from schools and local authorities in November 2018 as part of the annual School Workforce Census.

You can find the underlying data tables and regional, local authority and school tables here.

First published 02 July 2019