Home Menu

NAHT Edge

 

For middle leaders 

NAHT Edge is a category of NAHT membership spefically for middle leaders. We offer tailored support and services for middle leaders, online advice and resources, and full trade union protection to give you peace of mind.

Am I eligible? 

To be eligible to join NAHT Edge, you need have a leadership responsibility within an education setting. Roles that are eligible include ALENCO, SENCO, phase leaders and subject leaders. This is not an exhaustive list and if you would like further clarification please email joinus@naht.org.uk.

Join

If you would like to join NAHT Edge, or you’re a current member and would like to speak to someone on the phone, please give us a call on 0300 30 30 333, email us on info@naht.org.uk or click here

Help and advice

 

Classroom 

If you have responsibility in a specific area of the curriculum or are simply interested in best practice, our guides can help. 

Employment

If you want to know about your employment rights and whether you're being treated fairly and consistently, you can find help and advice on matters which may concern you as an employee. 

Management 

If you line manage staff or have accountability for a specific area, you can access help and advice to assist you in making informed decisions when carrying out your role.

 

Latest news 

NAHT's third coronavirus survey's findings: pupil support

On 4 May 2020, NAHT invited all members to complete a survey on their school’s educational and well-being provision for pupils. We received 4,784 responses, and the findings below are based on those responses.

Our key findings 
  • 88% of respondents stated that their school building is open in some form for eligible pupils to attend – either on its own (77%) or as part of a formal or informal hub-type arrangement (12%)
  • Only 3% of respondents said their school was closed due to lack of sufficient places. The three key reasons given for a lack of sufficient places were as follows:

o Parents/carers of eligible pupils chose not to access a school place because alternative arrangements were available (76%)

o Parents/carers of eligible pupils were unwilling to access a school place because of safety concerns for their children (58%)


o Parents/carers of eligible pupils were unwilling to access a school place because of safety concerns for others in their household (35%).

Provision for vulnerable children and children of key workers

  • We asked respondents what proportion of children of key workers in their school who were offered a place during lockdown took up the offer.

 

o 22% of respondents reported that 1%-5% had taken up the offer, while a further 15% reported that 6%-10% had done so


o 2% of respondents reported that none had taken up a place.

  • The key reasons that places for children of key workers were not taken up were as follows:

 

 

o Parents/carers had alternative arrangements in place (eg childcare, distance learning) (77%)


o Parents/carers of eligible pupils were unwilling to access a school place because of safety concerns for their children (66%)

o Parents/carers of eligible pupils were unwilling to access a school place because of safety concerns for others in their household (49%).

 

 

  • We asked respondents what proportion of vulnerable children in their school who were offered a place during lockdown took up the offer.

o 28% of respondents reported that 1%-5% had taken up the offer, while a further 10% reported that 6%-10% had done so


o 14% of respondents stated that none had done so. 

 

 

  • The key reasons that places for vulnerable children were not taken up were as follows:

o Parents/carers of eligible pupils were unwilling to access a school place because of safety concerns for their children (72%)


o Parents/carers of eligible pupils were unwilling to access a school place because of safety concerns for others in their household (50%)

o Parents/carers had alternative arrangements in place (eg childcare, distance learning) (49%). 

 

 

  • We asked respondents what actions their school had taken to reach out to vulnerable pupils not attending school during lockdown. The three most common were as follows:

o Telephone calls to vulnerable pupils and/or their families at home (98%)


o Liaising with social services to ensure continued provision of support (81%)

o Online contact with vulnerable pupils and/or their families at home (79%)  

 

 

  • Other responses included the following:

o 35% of schools are conducting regular or ad-hoc home visits 


o 43% of schools are providing access to school-based well-being support (eg counsellor)

o 50% of schools are liaising with health care services to ensure continued provision of support.   

 

 

 

Remote learning

 

 

 

  • 99.7% of respondents said they were providing home learning resources for pupils not attending school 

 

 

o 57% of respondents provide these home learning resources daily

 

o 29% provide them once a week.

 

  • We asked respondents about how they provided home learning resources and what this provision looks like. The three most common answers were as follows: 

 

o Sharing existing online resources (eg via email or school websites) (86%)

o Producing/creating our own online resources (78%)

o Providing physical resources (e.g. books, worksheets) (71%)

o Additionally, 67% of schools are liaising with parents/carers to ensure the accessibility of home learning for pupils 

  • 95% of respondents reported that these home learning resources were either broadly or closely aligned to the curriculum
  • In relation to external home learning resources, most respondents were as follows: 

 

 

 

o Using BBC Bitesize resources (84%) or DfE recommended online resources (61%)

o Just under half (47%) of respondents reported using resources provided by Oak National Academy as part of their home learning provision.

 

 

  • We asked respondents to estimate what proportion of their pupils would be unable to access online learning at home because they do not have the appropriate technology or internet connection. 

 

o 41% felt that between 1% and 10% of their pupils may face this difficulty

o 16% identified 11%-20% of their pupils who may struggle.  

 

 

 

Pupil support

 

 

  • The most common forms of pupil support reported were as follows:  

 

o Telephone calls to parents and carers (95%)

 

o Telephone calls to pupils (77%)

 

o Online contact with parents and carers (75%)

 

o Many schools are also signposting to support from charities (73%), arranging access/referrals to relevant services (51%), providing access to school-based wellbeing support (43%) and arranging access/referrals to mental health services (30%)

o16% of schools are offering bereavement support for families directly impacted by the coronavirus.

  • 60% of respondents had raised safeguarding concerns with social care, the police or other services about pupils since the coronavirus pandemic
  • We asked respondents what actions their school had taken to support families who may be facing financial difficulties during the coronavirus pandemic:  

 

o 85% have provided hard-copy materials / books / resources for pupils

o 78% have provided food vouchers through the national scheme

o 64% have provided food or care packages to families

o 42% have provided food vouchers from the school budget

o More than half (54%) have provided or signposted families to financial guidance/advice

o Just more than a third (36%), have provided devices/hardware to pupils without access to them at home.

 

First published 29 May 2020